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fire wood

Discussion in 'Survival Skills' started by Matt, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Matt

    Matt Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    what wood to use !!!!!!!

    if you need the fire to boil a kettle or do some light cooking(frying) this wood is best to use as it burns fast and hot

    ALDER
    ASPEN
    CEDAR
    HAWTHORN
    HORSE CHESTNUT
    LIME
    PINE
    POPLAR
    SPRUCE
    SYCAMORE

    if you need the fire to keep you warm during the night or cold damp days then this is the wood you should use

    APPLE
    ASH
    BEECH
    BIRCH
    SWEET CHESTNUT
    HAZEL
    HOLLY
    HORNBEAM
    LARCH
    OAK
    WILLOW......

    as these burn hot and long.......(you dont want to be running out off wood in the middle of the night) last thing you need is to be stumbling about in the dark looking for fire wood ​
     
  2. Shady

    Shady Extremely Talkative

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    i heard somewhere mate, there is a certain way to place logs to get them to burn more efficiently, any chance you can elaborate please??
     
  3. stephenjames213

    stephenjames213 Technical Support

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    There are many ways of doing this ,,one is a self feeding fire ,, when i have some time i will do a little post about one
     
  4. Woodland

    Woodland Extremely Talkative

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    The chances are that you will just have to settle for burning whatever grows nearby to be fair.
     
  5. Matt

    Matt Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    good point mate ....................i spose when its cold anywood is good wood :D
     
  6. fishingwalkies

    fishingwalkies Slightly Addicted

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    its a toss up between, using vital energy looking for certain wood....or just using what is near and close to hand/easy to collect etc etc.

    regarding shapes and styles of fires, there are menay different types for different scenarios, one of the best for heat is 2 large-ish logs lengthways close together (similar to railway lines) and then all the smaller stuff in between these, this type of fire acts like a long radiator, build it in front of your shelter....not too close (for safety) and buils a screen behind it to reflect the heat of the fire INTO your shelter/basha/tent etc etc! hope that helps a little
     
  7. fishingwalkies

    fishingwalkies Slightly Addicted

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    another point to think of, when it comes to efficiency/keeping a fire lit, if you are ever away from your fire and need it to stay lit (nighttime/bedtime) is the best example of this is......as you are burning your fire throughout the day place a large log (slice of large stump) next to the flames just so it chars well one the side then as you go to sleep place the large stump/log char side down onto the fire, this will then just smoulder all night (even sometimes throughout a decent rainfall) in the morning uncover the charred side from all the ash and create an air tunnel, this will usually "relight your fire" (in the words of TAKE THAT) whilst feeding small bits of kindling into the air tunnel......
     
  8. Raym Ears

    Raym Ears Slightly Talkative

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    Good tip that mate!
     
  9. woodstock

    woodstock Quite Addicted

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    Not that simple, all around us was green hazel and willow great for working with but no good on a fire, so you have to go further afield to get decent wood sometimes 3 or 4 mile hike, we would do that in fair weather and leave as much good wood close by for gathering when the weather turned, you also have to start a log pile and leave to season.
    This year a friend living in the valley was down to 1/2 doz fires before his wood pile ran out and this guy is out at the crack of dawn almost every morning, even people with years of living of grid can get into difficulties when the weather turns, this year and the tail end of last was rough.
     
  10. Strange Brew

    Strange Brew Quite Talkative

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    Are we talking seasoned wood here or Green? I've never known Alder to burn fast Green,neither Sycamore. Pine,Larch,Spruce and Birch to burn fast Green. For a long burn, Oak and Beech not so sure about hazel,Larch and Birch.
     
  11. Matt

    Matt Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    seasoned:rolleyes::)
     
  12. HillBill

    HillBill Very Addicted Site Donor

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    Ash burns well green, and is one of the most common and useful woods.

    Ash, Birch and Yew are my favourite trees. Can do most things with just these 3. Well, just the first 2 really. I like Yew because it is a gorgeous wood and has good folklore surrounding it.