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Sad news

Discussion in 'The Campfire' started by HoboHubz, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. HoboHubz

    HoboHubz Quite Talkative

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  2. stephenjames213

    stephenjames213 Technical Support

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    very sad story that is feel sorry for his loved ones
     
  3. Matt

    Matt Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    that is sad news:(
     
  4. The Caretaker

    The Caretaker Quite Talkative

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    Wow thats amazingly sad! just goes to show, we should know our limits!
     
  5. Gazo

    Gazo Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    So sad and only 29 too.

    It states.

    Survival school instructor Ian Moran, who teaches extreme survival and bushcraft skills, said that it was extremely unlikely anybody could survive a Highland winter outdoors by living off the land.
    He said: “It would be a tall order for even the most professional person who calls himself a survivalist.
    “Maybe centuries ago, when Scotland was covered in woodland and teeming with wildlife, but not now.”



    Maybe he bit off more than he could chew or was not aware how hard it would be at this time of the year.
     
  6. Cavatina

    Cavatina Extremely Talkative

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    Hell, and here's me off to the Plymouth for the Bushbash in 10 day's time. Scary!!!!. Geoff
     
  7. elliott92

    elliott92 Very Addicted

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    very sad story that
     
  8. Shady

    Shady Extremely Talkative

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    Preparation and contingency planning are keys to survival.... it says there was a hostel close by, all he had to do was swallow his pride and ask to stay for a night or 2
     
  9. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    He was a careless fool and his friends and family are paying the price for his foolishness. He should have tried very short trial runs in his local area with emergency supplies (a mobile phone especially) before venturing out into the Scottish mountains - they may be small but they're killers.

    Expert map reading skills are vital up here otherwise you'll get lost and die very quickly.

    I really hope this serves as a lesson for future 'Bear Grylls' wannabe's. Our mountain rescue volunteers could do without the added danger to themselves trying to rescue these ill prepared people.
     
  10. Gangsta ov love

    Gangsta ov love Very Talkative

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    I can't understand why they have to plaster a big pic of bear grylls on the top of the story , just more media bs the guy was obviously trying something he always wanted to do and failed . Even if he had his mobile I seriously doubt he would have had signal anyway , people die on dartmoor regularly and you can always find a fault somewhere with something . But that doesn't make everybody a fool
     
  11. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    If you die at 29 through your own fault, that makes you a fool.
     
  12. Shady

    Shady Extremely Talkative

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    The problem with media is they only say what they want you to hear/read.... Did he suffer an injury? did he lose his phone? He was well equipped so obviously something went wrong.... i think until full facts are revealed (if they ever are) then we should be open minded before branding him a "fool".... if by trying to survive in scottish highlands for a year by living off the land he is a fool, then Admiral Nelson was a fool for losing his eye :D
     
  13. Gangsta ov love

    Gangsta ov love Very Talkative

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    And speaking ill of the dead makes you a fool !!
     
  14. Don

    Don Slightly Talkative

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    Things can go wrong very quickly if you dont know your own body signs, and limits
    and we dont know what realy went on

    There are always two sides to a story,my heart goes out to his family and let it be a lesson for all


    When we go out in cold weather,and look for these signs with people that are with you
     
  15. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    No need to get personal jimmy, I thought I was allowed an honest opinion?

    Anyway, that outdated belief is based on an ancient superstition of fear in case the dead come back to haunt you, not for any humanitarian reason. If someone wishes to speak ill of me when I'm dead, who cares? I certainly won't and neither will my family.

    We all make mistakes in life, it's how we learn to improve ourselves for the battle ahead (survival) right? Right, well I've made a couple of mistakes in life too when out hill walking with my wife and young kids (15 and 12) in the Scottish highlands and my missus was in the early stages of MS, but I managed to extricate myself and them without any real hardship or danger because I used my loaf (not the bread) and commonsense along with excellent map reading skills that I'd drummed into my brain till I could do it almost blindfolded.

    We had emergency rations for two days, 2 sets of spare dry clothes each, waterproofs from head to toe (essential in Scotland) and we had logged our time of departure and expected time of return in the visitors book of course, forward planning in case of any unforeseen circumstances - we were only doing a daytime trip for goodness sake, but I know what our winters are like on high ground. It's the mist and the white outs that kill experienced folks.

    You stop for a five minute grub break, you don't even notice the mist descending until it's too bloody late! You look around and suddenly realize with a sinking heart that you haven't a clue where you are and which way to go. Did we come up a steep slope? Are we above a river? Are there peat bogs around?

    The last thing to do is blunder about in a panic. Sit down and get out your map and compass, take a bearing from your last known position (as near as possible), ignore all the squealing from the missus and kids and do your best to plot a safe route off the hill.

    Well, I didn't do that did I and we nearly paid the ultimate price. I sort of knew exactly which way to go. I knew we were in a wee gully on the high ground and if we headed along it then we'd reach the long downward path towards our landy and safety! Hmm, two hours later we're coming across the very same landmarks that we'd passed before. I'm beginning to slightly panic now.

    Visibility is down to around four feet and I haven't a clue where to go next. My kids are crying, my wife trusts me but she's giving me a scared look with her eyes and I'm getting scared too because I don't know what to do next.

    As we'd been tramping about for hours, I suggested a grub break, more to calm them down and give me some time to think clearly. I reassured them that we won't die because the rescue guys will know that we're overdue plus we've got lots of spare clothing to wear and still have lots of warm drinks in our stainless steel flasks - dogs bollocks they are - but I was still very worried. I knew I could manage on my own but trying to do it with two young kids and my vulnerable wife I guessed I was in shite street.

    It's surprising what a wee rest, a bit of grub and twenty fags can do. I hunkered down and dug out our map and compass. Took a fairly rough idea of where we were and plotted the most likely route home.

    We followed that compass like panic stricken rats leaving a sinking ship. It took hours with lots of twists and turns while desperately trying to keep in a straight line - but you can't when following a compass, you have to move around natures obstacles, especially in undulating ground. And you have to go very, very slowly using a walking staff to test for ground dangers, preferably one person tied to the others while that person is testing ahead.

    It was pitch black when we suddenly caught sight of a tree line against the dark night sky and mist about twenty feet away - sheesh, we all sat down and cried with absolute joy! We still had about two hours to reach our vehicle, but it was easy even in the dark and mist because it was a well trodden path and very easy to follow.

    So we all got home safely.

    Do you know why? Do you even care?

    Because I always over prepared for any trip. My wife and kids were always saying "you're too fussy!" I'm bloody glad I was fussy that day. It's the best way to get old.

    If I'm a fool, at least I'm an old fool. :D
     
  16. stephenjames213

    stephenjames213 Technical Support

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    You say about the mist and fog in scotland? This is one of the big reasons the romans could not get a firm hand over the country and bring them to bay and could not control the painted blue tribes(highlanders), as the mist playd a big part in keeping there country safe from invasion because the mist/fog hide all dangers and the unknown from the person/people hicking or just on a day out in the highlands ,,,,,living in plymouth the fog is not all that bad but i have been on fishing trips around the coast and nearly plunged over a cliff face because the mist was very high and shuck your sinces to bits ...
     
  17. HillBill

    HillBill Very Addicted Site Donor

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    Not necessarily. Sometimes warnings need to be given.

    The facts as we have them are that he was well prepared and well equipped, yet he died of hypothermia, in a building.

    No evidence of any injuries.

    So didn't he have a sleeping bag?, any means to make fire? no way to boil some water/melt snow?

    Sounds to me like he was totally uprepared and misguided, with an over inflated opinion of his own skills and knowledge and he copped for it.

    So unless he suffered a debilitating injury, then yes he was a fool. If he did, then i truly sympathize with him.

    At the same time, i really do feel for his family. The stuff that must be going through their heads will be awful.