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tracking

Discussion in 'Wildlife' started by Matt, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Matt

    Matt Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    Most people in the bush these days come from a noisy town or city.wher they are used to the backgraound sounds
    such as,Crowds,TrafficPeople you work with,Family,Music,Tv,Mobilephones, And many other luxuarys of the civilization as we call it today.

    The people that live city life day in day out normaly bring this with them , City life haits,Preconceptions of nature. They will have learnt to tune out the noise.

    There for they need to relax,Not in the way that holiday makers do this, Completely relax, The sense of releasing tension and their preconceptions of bushy life! and tune in to nature at her best.

    When out and walking in the bush the First thing you need to learn is to walk slow,Often stoping to take alook around and listen to the sounds around you,If you look around on the ground and see if you can spot signs of animal Tracks,also check out trees and the sky.

    Are the squirrels calling in the trees? The birds circling and crying out? Can you hear animals moving? Do you smell anything strange?What animals are they?Is ther poo or tracks? What animal left them? Are they recent?

    In english then, The first thing to do is size up what local life is living in the bush you are camping in or walking throu, You should walk like a deer, Stop look around listen, Walk 10 yards and repeat this over and over always watching and listening.

    If you learn to do this you will soon start to see more animals and much more activity in nature then you were aware of. This is a special skill, You cant learn over night or on one weekend. You must learn not to look for shapes, But "odd things" or "different" "out of place" so to say, You will never spot a deer like you would say a "red top" hanging in a tree, What you will spot is an irregular patch of color that dos not match the grass or bush and trees, Is it a rock? Or a stump? Stand as still as you can and be quite, And watch for a little while, Did it move? Listen,Smell,Watch.

    Never should never watch where your heading , Look behind to, To the side, Up ,Down look at everything. soon you will get a sense of hat looks normal,smells and sound normall.

    There is , also a safety issue , Some one walking who stops freqent to look around and see whats going on and listens is less likely to walk blindly around a corner in to a ditch,Over a cliff, Stumble upon dangeras and unwanted nastys...

    The best a big goal you come away with is experienceing nature in it's own glory and grace... ​
     
  2. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    Excellent advice there for folks new to the tracking game.

    I reckon most older people learned a fair bit when we were young and had total freedom to roam without parents worrying about us, I feel quite sorry for youngsters growing up today.
     
  3. fishingwalkies

    fishingwalkies Slightly Addicted

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    Yeah its a crap situation that our kids are in today "too scared to go anywhere" and "nowhere else to go"....when we go out with the dogs (myself and my 2 boys) we try and spot the rabbit tracks and try and work out how old the trail is via the "poo" that is left, if anyone from round Doncaster wants to do a bit, I can show them a few little areas (big) that are full of tracks, easy to spot etc and might open someones eyes. it only takes an hour or so!!!!
     
  4. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    Nice one mate. :D
     
  5. Gazo

    Gazo Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    This is the part I loved while out hunting, walking as you suggested it would take me an hour to walk a small bit of woodland that would normally take 15-20mins to walk. taking in all the sights, sounds and smells.
    I even learnt my jack russell bitch hand signals as not to make a sound when telling her to stay or sit.
    You need to walk like this to really appreciate the country side and to what is going on around you.
     
  6. Shady

    Shady Extremely Talkative

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    i remember as a child my grandfather would take me billberry picking (i ate more than i put in the pot) every so often he would be talking to me then out of nowhere he would say "shh do you hear that?" needless to say that at first i shook my head then he would tell me to be quiet as he slowly walked with me up the edge of an embankment (this place is Ganny Bank...on the road from Mow Cop to Astbury) there would always be a bird or animal of some description, i thought he had super human hearing but once i started listening i would soon be hearing them too!!

    It has been a long time now and i have lived in cities so am probably out of tune with nature :(
     
  7. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    You never lose it mate, you'll see and hear much more in the city than those that haven't got the skills, trust me I've lived in a few towns and cities in my time. :D
     
  8. Cavey

    Cavey Very Talkative

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    Incidentally, I taught all our kids to pluck/dress birds and skin/dress rabbits, they may never use those skills but I know if they ever do need them then they'll soon remember how it's done. You may get rusty but you never forget.
     
  9. primitiveskills

    primitiveskills Slightly Talkative

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    Tracking is the original literary device. Unlike the written word, tracking is a living entity and it is written upon a breathing "document". The subtle changes in humidity, lighting, seasonal availability of food and the life cycles of predators and prey alike are only part of the unfolding drama. The other piece is the tracker themselves. They have to utilize all of their senses and many different parts of their brain to decipher the overwhelming array of information that goes largely unnoticed by Homo sapien domesticofragilus. Identificationof the track, track pattern, and sign (such as rubs, chews, runs, lays, beds, trails, hair, and scat) only serve to build the cast of characters. The plot really begins to unfold through track and sign interpretation. Reading pressure realeases, track patterns, and gaits, learning trailing techniques so that you can see these "sentences" on different substrates such as leaf litter and pavement, learning track aging technjiques and using the "setting" of the ecological context all make tracking much more engaging than the finest written literature. Just my opinion.
     
  10. Matt

    Matt Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    what a great way of thinking mate (good read) thanks for posting it ...matt
     
  11. megga

    megga Extremely Talkative

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    Great bits of advice ther. As i was brought up in a city (Derby) i never even tought about stuff like this, but i escaped and moved to Melton Mowbray, and soon started to grt the urge to want to try and hunt. At first it was just about shooting, but i had a day on my permission when i firsted tried to decoy a magpie. That was the fiest time i had heard the country side. Having to stay still and not make a sound, i realised that i had been walking round almost deaf. Now when i go, even if i dont get to shoot, i come back as happy as larry and so relaxed. All that i know i have had to learn myself, and its a preety big learning curve, and i know i have only just started. As tracking goes, i have no idea at all, i would love some tips, and the flight path and habbits of birds. If any of you have anything to share, it would be great.
     
  12. primitiveskills

    primitiveskills Slightly Talkative

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    We just put this one together for folks who want to share tracking, but we have six others detailing the different disciplines of tracking as well. Please let me know if you find this and the others useful.




     
  13. primitiveskills

    primitiveskills Slightly Talkative

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  14. m00thman

    m00thman Extremely Talkative

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    Here are a few animal tracks and signs that I've encountered while hiking. In the first one is an adult wild boar track. In the other ones, as you can see, it's from a wild boar cub.

    DSC09514.jpg DSC09516.jpg DSC09518.jpg

    Here is the place where the wild boars had rested in the mud. And, obviously, a place where they had scratched against the bark of a pine tree. Because of the resin, some hair remained glued there.

    DSC09519.jpg DSC09504.jpg

    Here, in the first one, the bear must have been very big. Maybe a female with cubs, because I've seen smaller ones near. The last one I'm not sure if it's from a big dog or a wolf. Maybe a more experienced person could tell the difference. I can't. It was kinda far from any village, in a place where, in the summer, shepherds are found (and some of them have really big dogs, like the Carpathian Shepherd Dog). But it was December, and the shepherds are in that area only until September. Oh, and that knife has 17 cm (6.7 inches).

    Picture 013.jpg Picture 009.jpg DSC04221.jpg