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Tree Identification

Discussion in 'Wildlife' started by Gazo, Jan 14, 2012.

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  1. Gazo

    Gazo Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    Tree Identification

    Common Oak


    History


    [FONT=&amp]Distribution[/FONT][FONT=&amp]: Found throughout the UK[/FONT]

    Oaks are long lived trees, with many being 500 or more years old. But some have been known to live to over 800 years. Oak wood is good to work with, and well sort after for Building and many other uses.
    The Oak will take up to 70 to 80 years before it begins to produce acorns. By then the trunk will be approx. 20” in diameter, but this will still be a young tree in the life of an Oak.
    After it has reached 100 years old, it will only increase in girth by about 1” per year, but this extremely hard dense wood is highly prized as a building material and firewood
    The Oak became the main wood for making charcoal. And it later became the main construction material for Ships and Houses as it was strong and durable and its twisted branches provided the right shapes needed. In Elizabethan times, a law had to be passed, protecting the Oak, to give the tree a chance to re-establish itself as so much of the great oak forests had been felled for building materials, fuel and barrels for alcohol to name a few.



    Identification

    [FONT=&amp]
    Leaf & Seed (acorn)[/FONT]

    oak pic.jpeg
    The leaves have large deep lobes and smooth edges. There are two tiny lobes where the leaf joins the stalk. The edge of the leaf is lobed and wavy. There are 4 to 7 lobes on each side of the leaf. The lobes tend to taper into the stem. Leave start to appear around April time and sheds in autumn, usually around November.
    Acorns can be found from May till late September where they start to turn brown and drop off. Acorns are a favourite food of the Squirrel, Jay and Wood Pigeon.



    Bark

    oak-bark-1.jpg
    The bark is coloured grey with deep grooves in it. The trunk can grow to a massive size, a girth of 10 metres (33ft) being quite possible in older trees of up to 800 years old.
     
  2. Gazo

    Gazo Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    Re: Is this worth putting on the forum somewhere

    Common Ash


    History


    Ash is the 4th commonest tree species in Britain and is sometimes the dominant tree in most woodlands. The ash tree can grow to a height of around 40 meters, with a spread of around 20 meters. And has been known to live up to 400 years.
    Ash trees grow best on fairly damp soil, Ash woodlands do not have as rich a collection of birds as most woodlands do, though Wrens, Blackbirds, Robins and chaffinches can usually be found in Ash woodlands.
    It is also naturally found in Europe, Asia and North Africa. Ash grows in deep, moist, well-drained soil. It grows best on northern and eastern sides of hills where the atmosphere is cool and moist. The Ash is often found in Welsh Woodlands which has these good growing conditions.
    Ash wood is a white wood and very tough and is used for Snooker Cues, Tennis Rackets, Skies, oars, Hockey sticks, axe-handles, and many other tools and sporting goods.


    Leaf and Seeds

    Fraxinus-excelsior.jpg
    Leaves are dark green with usually 9 to 11 oval leaf-lets, turning yellow in autumn. With Black leaf buds in winter.
    The Ash is one of the last trees to leaf, and is one of the first to shed its leaves in the autumn.
    The fruit/seeds are popularly known as helicopter seeds as they spin in the air to help them spread as far from the tree as possible.


    Bark

    ash-bark-1.jpg
    The bark is silver grey and will develop a network of criss-crossing diamond shaped ridges in older trees.
     
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  3. Gazo

    Gazo Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    Hazel



    History

    The Hazel tree or ’Tree of Knowledge’, The Celts associated Hazel Trees with wisdom and inspiration and it was thought that new skills and knowledge could be gained by eating Hazelnuts The Hazel tree is member of the birch family, commonly found throughout Britain and Europe, Hazel trees can also be found in America, North Africa, Turkey and in Central and Northern Asia. Hazel trees can grow up to a height of 8-10 metres and up to 20 meters wide and can live upto 70 years old, but if it is coppiced, either by people or naturally through damage to its trunks, it will live much longer. The Hazel branches are widely used as country hedging



    Leaf and Seeds

    hazel leaf.jpg hazelnut tree nut.jpg hazelnut brown.jpg


    The Leaves are almost round in shape but with a sudden sharp point at the end, but tend to be wider at the top.

    The male flowers are long yellow catkins, also known as 'lamb's tails'. They first appear around late October to early November, and are short and green, Between February and April they open up to release their pollen. The female flowers, which grow on the same tree, are small, red and bud-like in appearance. It is the female flowers which develop into the hazelnuts. Hazelnuts are approx. 15–25 mm long and 10–15 mm in diameter. The nuts are ready to eat and will fall from the tree around September – October time.
    [FONT=&amp]
    Bark [/FONT]


    hazel_bark old.jpg
    The bark of hazel trees is dark brown and smooth in young trees and cracked on mature trees.
     
  4. Gazo

    Gazo Administrator Staff Member Site Donor

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    Birch
    History
    [FONT=&amp]Few trees have been so important to so many people. Historically, Birch (Betula papyrifera) as well as other species, were possibly the most important trees to many indigenous people across the northern latitudes around the world. This tree increased the quality of life of people for thousands of years. The fact that the Birch tree varies in thickness and can be split in numerous layers, and that it has a resinous inner bark, which makes it waterproof and resistant to decay, makes it an extremely versatile tree. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]The silvery white bark gives her a striking appearance. The papery bark peels off easily. It is thin, yet tough, and has in fact been used as paper in the past. As the tree grows older the bark begins to form a layer of cork that provides excellent insulation and protects it against the cold weather. The young twigs and branches are reddish brown and very elastic. Early in the year the birch is one of the first trees to leaf up. The triangular/heart-shaped leaves are serrated at the edges and covered by a sticky resinous substance with an aromatic, balsamic scent when they first emerge.[/FONT]
    Birch figures in many anglicised place names, such as Birkenhead, Birkhall and Berkhamstead, and appears most commonly in northern England and Scotland.
    [FONT=&amp]On the Isle of Colonsay in the Western Isles of Scotland, Birch boughs were hung over cradles to protect them from fairies. In Welsh lore, birches were associated with love. In Siberia, tribal peoples, such as the Khanty still use birch bark to make containers for food, and peel off strips of the under bark to use as tinder for fires; the tree is not harmed. They also communicate through runic like symbols cut into birch trunks as messages for other passing that way; a living signpost! Interestingly, the word birch is thought to have derived from the Sanskrit word bhurga meaning a 'tree whose bark is used to write upon'.[/FONT]

    Leaf and Seeds


    betula_pendula.jpg



    Bark

    birchBark.jpg



    Uses

    The birch to the vikings was the tree of life - every part of the tree can be used one way or another for everything from clothing to food. its an amazing tree which is considered to be almost a weed - in Scandinavia they call it the mother tree as it protects the pines as they grow.
    The tree can be tapped for it's sap,
    The best time to tap a birch is in March and April, when the sap is rising.

    Birch sap.jpg After you have finished always plug the hole.

    Bark can be used for fire tinder, you can also make food containers from it.
    Infact in some parts of the world they have even made canoes from the bark.
    The tree has endless uses.
     
  5. woodstock

    woodstock Quite Addicted

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